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How to use social distancing in marketing

How to use social distancing in marketing

Anyone who’s watched a recently recorded TV show or sports event will see social distancing in place.  From screens showing people watching online and canned laughter to widely spaced out quiz contestants and presenters spread out around the CBeebies house, entertainment is having to adapt.  This now needs to be the case in your marketing, to show you’re adapting to the changing world of masks and 2 metre high fives.  Here’s some great examples of brands staying current in a pandemic world with social distancing in marketing.

COVID-19 marketing with Amazon

Amazon don’t always have the warm fuzzy feeling in their marketing, choosing to focus on speed and convenience.  Outbreaks in factories and warehouses make headlines, so Amazon are quick to show their team being taken care of.  Employees in masks, temperature checks and masks being transported around the world, to make sure they can keep going, shows the public they can order using Amazon safe in the knowledge that the people behind the delivery aren’t being put at risk.

Keep it real about social distancing marketing with Heineken

One of my personal favourites.  Let’s face it, communicating digitally doesn’t always go to plan.  Tech break downs, barking dogs, wifi connection issues, propping up your phone and embarrassing home life events in the background are all here, along with everyone’s favourite “you’re on mute, I can’t hear you” – they’re all here.  Heineken gives a nod to everyone staying safe at the expense of convenience in a humourous way, and it really works as a way of putting social distancing in marketing.

Masks in marketing with Vistaprint

There is information to show that people feel more positive about adverts with masks in, perhaps because it better reflects real life right now.  Vistaprint have made masks the key focal point of their advert, promoting masks as not something to hide behind, but a show of solidarity and resilience.  Print isn’t even mentioned here, but personally I remembered their name the next time I put my mask on.

Stay home with Dominos Pizza (it’s not all bad)

Launched at the start of the pandemic, this Dominos advert showed that while staying home can feel isolating, it’s also a chance to, well, dance around in your pants before a pizza arrives.  It’s not perfect as you see the pizza being handed over and no masks, but then this is perhaps before all of the processes kicked in.  And it’s still a fun way to look at staying home.

Social distancing in marketing for SMEs

For those that aren’t big enough to be doing massive TV adverts, these ideas can still be transferred to your marketing.  This is actually an opportunity to embrace video as more people are used to more raw video footage.  COVID-19 marketing for SMEs can be as simple as a screenshot of the online team talk as part of a social media marketing campaign, an altered strapline or logo to incorporate social distance or the use of masks, or a reassuring chain of email marketing to show how a business is not just surviving the pandemic, but working to be resilient and thrive.

subway

(image from Subway)

Get in touch for more information on marketing through a pandemic with social distancing in marketing

PR verses Paid Advertising

Everyone knows the term PR and everyone know the term advertising, but there is often confusion on where one starts and one ends.  There are a couple of clear distinctions when it comes to PR verses advertising but it’s true, the two do often overlap.

Paid or ‘free’

Advertising is most often paid for, in that you pay for an advert in a paper or on TV, or you pay for a stand at an exhibition and so on.  PR is theoretically ‘free’, but in truth you would likely need a PR professional or agency who would charge a monthly retainer or fee.

Guarantee or no guarantee

If you pay for advertising, then that advertising goes ahead as long as you pay the invoice.  With PR, you’re putting the message out there but there is no guarantee that media will pick it up.  How well it works is dependant on how strong your message is, where it’s communicated to, what else is going on and how your story ties in to everything else in the world.  It can even depend on whether or not an editor or writer’s personal ideals, values and preferences.

Sales or news

Everyone knows what an advert is – it’s someone trying to sell you something.  PR is marketing messages tied up in news, whether that’s a product release, a new appointment, an ethical stance, a campaign or a new partnership.  It is often only those that are in marketing or business, or have an idea of PR, that can tell that what is ‘news’ is actually marketing messages cleverly distributed.

Visual or language

With PR, there’s no ‘news’ that is completely visual whereas in advertising there are often adverts where all there is are visuals with very little text.  Language skills and experience is much more important when it comes to PR.  Design is much more important when it comes to advertising.  Having said that, there are more elements of design creeping in to PR in the form of infographics and video.

Exposure or trust

If you’re happy for as many people as possible to see your message and that exposure is what you’re hoping to achieve then advertising is a strong bet, as it is guaranteed exposure in the place you want to put it.  If you are looking to establish trust with the general public, as maybe a more complex or established business, then PR is something to consider.

In reality, it is a mix of both advertising and PR that will get you the most sustained results.  If you’re looking for some information on how advertising and PR can help build awareness and belief in your business, get in touch.

Marketing campaigns – changing the world

It’s possibly an exaggeration to say that any marketing campaign could change the whole world.  But that’s not to say that marketers only sell things, the campaigns they make can make a huge difference in perceptions across society (as well as sell things)!

This month has shown a strong example as Cadbury’s join forces with Age UK to help fight loneliness in elderly people across the country.  To help understand what that kind of extreme loneliness feels like, TV presenter Sue Perkins spent 30 hours in total isolation, then having explored the impact of loneliness, Cadbury’s packaging of the Dairy Milk bar stated it’s donating 30p from every pack sold to Age UK.  Awareness of the Cadbury’s adverts increased by 11% in the over 65’s.

Superhuman marketing campaigns

This isn’t the first marketing campaign trying to make a difference.  An amazing campaign in 2012 was Channel 4’s ‘Meet the superhumans’, set out to redefine what it is to be an athlete and what strength really is.  Featuring footage of a variety of athletes with disabilities carrying out sports able bodied people might find challenging and an epic soundtrack, this campaign demonstrated these 2012 athletes as role models and celebrities in their own right, and catapulted the Paralympics forward as a top event to watch, equal to the Olympics themselves.

Campaign like a girl

Another groundbreaker – not least because it was a strong female statement to make at an overly masculine event; the Superbowl.  Feminine hygiene company Always‘ advertising spot was where they tried to redefine what it means to do something ‘like a girl’, but showing that before society gets to them, ‘like a girl’ to young girls means ‘do it as fast/hard/well as you can’.  #LikeAGirl is a hashtag that still stands today and continues to make a strong and relevant statement.

The fact is marketing campaigns don’t need to be that extreme in that they change the way a whole stadium thinks about something.  But a campaign that generates a smile, a laugh or even a ‘huh, I hadn’t thought about it like that’, is time well spent and money well invested.  It’s campaigns like this that will make a business not just stand out but also build credibility and trust.

As seen on Channel 4

Two of our clients are featured in the new Channel 4 series “A new life in the sun”.  After filming with them over the course of six months in 2015, the first episode screened last night in the UK.

Tune in to watch the lovely Roseanna growing her Marbella bootcamp business Aurora Bootcamp and the wonderful Yvonne & Ray as they run their stunning 5 star B & B in Andalucia, Cortijo Sabila.

DIY PR

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We do PR. We do it well. But we urge clients to create stories that will engage with the Press, even if they need a hand getting them out.

So if you want to embark on some local exposure for your own business, where do you start?

The 11 R’s

  1. Reach  Think about the user – who you want to read the story and pick those publications that are your demographic. Are you a niche or general
  2. Research  Take the time to build a comprehensive list of publications that could suit ALL your business’s angles. Get the right contacts.
  3. Read  One story does not fit all! Read your target media’s publications, know what they like & create an angle they will want to use.
  4. Relationships Take the time to develop relationships with relevant media contacts for your area. Connect on social media & face to face, network.
  5. React If something’s happened in your local area, or on the news, you can link a further story to, use it. Within 24 hours! Offer yourself for interview.
  6. Relevant  Journalists report interesting news, not your sales blurb. Be timely, relevant, interesting and new. Inspire and engage them with your story.
  7. Remember You want to be remembered so find ways to tie your company, locality, product etc into a memorable piece
  8. Right Write it right! Follow guidelines for what makes a great story and write it as you’d expect to see it in your target publication.
  9. Ring  Ring your connections first, sell in the story, be personal and follow up quickly with the piece. Ring back!
  10. Respond  If someone uses your piece, say thank you (of course). Publicise it. Use it. Show it off. Send it to prospects. Build the buzz.
  11. Resolution Stories are used more often if they have a press quality photo. High resolution for print! But make it a good photo! Stage it well.

Top tips

Don’t think PR is a quick job. Done well it takes many hours per story but it is worth it!

Use a newswire service.  
If you can afford it, it will potentially increase your media reach (broadcast your news further).

SEO benefits.  Anything published online at a quality site with backlinks to your website can help boost Search Engine results.

Utilize the cloud. Create electronic press kits, pdfs, photos etc in Dropbox and share it. Don’t attach everything to email!

Ask to see the many examples of reactive pieces we have got published, creative stories we have generated and fabulous press coverage for our clients across all media.

D3 Marketing – Portsmouth marketing; Portsmouth design; Portsmouth website

Latest D3 Marketing work : PR & Awards

ffLocal PR can deliver great brand awareness and new customers. But how do you create the stories that the media want to use? You use D3 Marketing to do it for you.

For FISHCRAFT and Flaming Cow, two sister restaurants in Eton (Windsor), we researched and submitted their entries to the UK’s gluten free Eating Out awards. Gluten Free is a key USP of both venues. And both restaurants were shortlisted. Being part of the awards has generated great social media exposure, and has online SEO benefits, but also allowed us to get the story published across many media. A triple success. The final winners are announced on 17th November in London.

Contact us about creating stories that create impact in the press.

Boutique in a Bus is a new concept in Dorset. And we wanted to let people know. Our PR team rolled into action and the wheels were soon spinning, generating a huge amount of press coverage.

biab We are the City (over 17,000 people read this article!) 

Bloggers articles like this one

Profile piece in Dorset Business Matters

AND  a 15 minute Radio Solent interview from the bus!

 

D3 Marketing – Portsmouth marketing; Portsmouth design; Portsmouth website.